This is a guest post from Antonina of OpenBuildings – a community-driven and openly editable encyclopaedia of buildings from around the world. 

In the last couple of decades cardboard has been rediscovered as an architectural material for being light yet load-resistant, recyclable, nature-friendly and warm, just like wood, from which it is derived. Treatment with different chemical materials and production techniques allow for higher fire and moisture resistance, greater strength and flexibility: some of the buildings, made entirely or partly of cardboard, boost a life-expectancy of approximately 20 years. However, cardboard’s actual big time popularity can be observed in interior design, where creativity is mostly unlimited by structural and safety requirements. The recent environmental trend of recycling various objects has really led us out of the cardboard box through imaginative, witty and cheap designs.

dARCH studio: Papercut

dARCH Studio: Papercutimage: Vasilis Skopelitis

Grimshaw Architects: Fashion Pavilion

Grimshaw Architects: Fashion Pavilion image: Grimshaw Architects

B3 Designers: Cardboard Cafe

B3 Designers: Cardboard Cafeimage: B3 Designers

Carlos Teixeira: The Same, The Other

Carlos Teixeira: The Same, The Otherimage: Carlos Teixeira

Studio JVM: Hidden Lines

Studio JVM: Hidden Linesimage: Studio JVM

Toby Horrocks & Kristian Aus: Flatform 322

Toby Horrocks & Kristian Aus: Flatform 322image: Ellen Dewar

Shigeru Ban: Paper Tea House

Shigeru Ban: Paper Tea Houseimages: dezeen.com

Joost van Bleiswijk & Alrik Koudenburg: Nothing Office

Joost van Bleiswijk & Alrik Koudenburg: Nothing Officeimage: Joachim Baan

CJ Lim/Studio 8 Architects: Seasons Through the Looking Glass

CJ Lim/Studio 8 Architects: Seasons Through the Looking Glassimages: dezeen.com

Burn Toast Design: Smithfield Menswear Cardboard Shop

Burn Toast Design: Smithfield Menswear Cardboard Shopimage: Shaw and Shaw